kinect in elementary

 

Kinect Reflections After 30 Days by Cheryl Arnett

Sunday, October 9th, 2011

Cheryl Arnett

is an elementary teacher from Craig, Colorado.  In 2010, she was a winner in Microsoft’s US Partner in Learning event. I had the opportunity to meet Cheryl this past summer and have maintained contact with her through an initiative we are working on together with to develop Kinect activities.  An inspiration for all, here are recent reflections Cheryl sent about integrating Kinect in her classroom.

Tomorrow will be our 30th day of school. My first graders are engaged in learning and growing. One of the highlights so far has been the inclusion of Xbox 360 Kinect games in our lessons. The children loved that from the minute they saw it, but, for me, it has been a learning process for the teacher. Using new technology tools in the classroom involves extra time and thought during implementation. The payoffs, however, can be quite rewarding. That has been the case with using Kinect.

Equipped with the TV, Xbox360, Kinect sensor, and a wide selection of games, I began the year with many ideas and expectations for inspiring learning in my students. Two obstacles presented themselves right away. The first was, and always is in the classroom, time. The second was how to manage 21 students and one gaming system. Loving a challenge, I jumped in and began to experiment.

The time issue dissolved as I moved past the need to use the games just because they were there. When any technology tool becomes a natural part of the learning process (no different than using a pencil and paper), it becomes powerful and incorporated where it will do the most good. Rather than planning times for Kinect, I am now considering the wide variety of possibilities (check out the growing list of ideas from Kinect in Education) to enhance our lessons. As with all learning tools, you start with the learning objective, then select the methods, tools, and materials that best achieve the desired results. Used in that way, Xbox 360 Kinect, or any video gaming system can become a part of learning without creating a time problem.

Management is another common issue in the classroom. Engagement has never been a problem as my students are mesmerized by the Kinect games. I could tell right away that if I could direct their enthusiasm, we were sitting on a gold mine of learning possibilities. The difficulty was that only one student could actually "play" the game at a time. The other students were cheering and enjoying the process, but there was not enough active learning participation to suit me. The game Body and Brain Connections helped me solve the problem. That particular game is full of activities that reinforce math concepts I teach. We are working on addition to 10 and learning a variety of ways to make each number. One game is called Perfect Tens (facts for 10 are an important skill to master). The player has to use his or her hands to mark two numbers with a sum of 10 before the timer runs out. We discovered that the Kinect sensor focuses in on a narrow enough area, that while one student was actually controlling the game, all the other students could participate from behind and beside the player. The results were delightful and obviously productive:

 

I added to the lesson, recording sheets for each child to keep track of his or her score. The children can see their own growth and are motivated to improve their score as in any video game setting. They are learning the facts for 10 more quickly than I could have imagined and they think they are playing!! (The scores will soon become another lesson as we use arrow cards to learn about place value and how to read big numbers.)

Of course, learning the facts for 10 is just one of the many skills we will inspire with our gaming system. The possibilities are endless. Patience is the key. Rather than forcing the games into lessons, I will find the natural applications as they arise. Group participation is the next key as managing the use of the tool becomes no different than passing out paper for spelling practice.

The final advantage and payoff for using Kinect in the classroom is the addition of activity to stimulate both the body and the brain! The first brain rule (Brain Rules by John Medina) is that exercise boosts brain power. Children naturally want to move so why not channel that movement into the learning process! Everyone wins!

After just 30 days of learning with Xbox 360 Kinect, I am convinced that it holds tremendous potential for education. A little time spent working out the bugs and exploring the possibilities will reap great benefits for children!

 
 

App: Activity Learning For Kinect

Monday, July 25th, 2011

There is a lot of work being done with Kinect to recognize gestures and even sign language; this application “learns” activities such as running, walking and skipping. There is more information on this blog which I viewed using Google translate. The following youtube video is worth watching.

 


Link: “Activity Learning” Using Kinect Skeletal Data
What interests me here is how this would work with people who have physical coordination problems. You could add someone’s non-conformist gesture to a recognized gesture library and they could then control applications using it.
It also has PE applications I’m sure.
Tom Smurthwaite
 

Kinect Paint: Hand Painting Without the Mess

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

This application, Kinect Paint, is a lot of fun to play around with. Although developments are still early, this undoubtedly has definite implications in elementary classrooms and is further evidence that the Kinect development community is growing strong.

As this Kinect community grows, the need for accessible downloads is warranted. This is provided a single executable file, making it easier for everyone to access. Most developments thus far have required you to compile source code, which can be tedious and perplexing. That being considered, make sure you read the instructions from the provider’s site in order to get this to work, because you will need to download the Kinect SDK first. If that sounds like too much legwork, I will tell you that it is beginning to become much easier to utilize these developments.

This application is available for download at paint.codeplex.com and is also listed in the Kinect Apps for Education directory at http://apps.kinecteducation.com. Using the Kinect and a PC, you can draw using coordinated hand movements.

Check out my video demonstration below. I may be super-nerd for filming myself like this; if I am, oh well. It’s far too cool not to share.

 

 

Direct video link


 

Digital Storytelling with Kinect

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

Digital storytelling just got way, way cooler…

With iClone and Kinect, teachers and students will be able to interact with virtual objects and scenes in real-time.

First seen on kinecthacks.net


 

 
 


  • Want to receive posts by email? Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner



  • RSS Unknown Feed


  •